The Deadliest Poison Abraham Joshua Hescel once said “Speech has power

The Deadliest Poison
Abraham Joshua Hescel once said “Speech has power, words do not fade, what starts as a word, ends in a deed.” Words can be the toughest weapons when used adequately as they have the ability to influence, deceive and monopolize people and circumstances. They construct numerous psychological connections and since thoughts determine actions, there’s a powerful link between our words and the outcomes we get.
In William Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar”, characters have been displayed as being manipulative and deceptive. The technique of manipulation was introduced at the beginning of the play through the character of Cassius. Cassius was planning to conspire against Caesar but his plans needed support from someone honorable and trustworthy. Cassius chose Brutus to join the conspiracy and decided to convince him that he is worthier of the crown than Caesar, he knew how much Brutus loved Rome, so he planted the idea of Caesar becoming a tyrant in Brutus’s mind to make him think that he wants to kill Caesar for the good of Rome rather than his personal good.
The second most remarkable manipulative character was Decius, he recognizes Caesar’s character flaw, which is arrogance, and plays on it. Decius was asked to take Caesar to the senate, when Caesar explains to him that he won’t go due to Calpurnia’s fears, he belittles him then asks him how will people react when they know that their ruler is giving in to his wife’s fears. Caesar then informs Decius about Calpurnia’s dream and tells him that in her dream his statue was spurting blood and citizens of Rome were laughing and bathing their hands in it. Decius reinterprets the dream by saying that Romans will gain lifeblood. Caesar was pleased with this interpretation and decides to go to the senate.