Literary Movement Every great American Author shares a type of literary movement

Literary Movement

Every great American Author shares a type of literary movement. These movements provide authors to create similar ideas within their works. Alice Walker shares the literary movement of postmodernism, this movement reflects both upon the highs and lows of culture and shows fourth the diminished tradition and structure. Walker, the author of The Color Purple, reveals that this astonishing novel portrays postmodernism by the setting of her book, which is being held during the period of segregation. Walker showcases how extremely strong African American women have to be to survive during the horrible times of segregation. Postmodernism best describes Walker’s works because all of her stories incorporate different aspects of African American culture.

What is American Literature? American Literature are any works of english literary that are created in the United States. American literature consists of poems, songs, novels, and essays, along with many other types of writings. American literature is very closely oriented to American culture and political stand points. There is a long lasting list of authors whose works serve as being great pieces of American Literature. These such authors explored and introduced many different types of tone and style that carved their unique writing into its very own culture of American character. Alice Walker consumes herself in creating her very own unique American Literature that is now known all around the world today, with all of her works being translated into more than twenty four languages with selling over fifteen million copies. Walker, like many other well known American authors uses very vivid imagery, that may seem to others as being hard to read because of its unpleasant story lines, but she does this to get her point across to her audiences that being an African American women during the time of segregation is not easy. Alice Walker is praised as a best selling author, poet, and a political activist, principle of liberal ideals by critics everywhere. Walker gave an active voice to be heard by women everywhere, specifically African American women. Along with all of that, Walker sparked her interest once again on the amazing author Zora Neale Hurston. Zora Neale Hurston works was deeply affected on the African American background and on her very own battles in being an African American woman herself. All of her works went nearly unonymous by the literary world for many years, up until Alice Walker, interest refreshed just nearly after she published In Search of Zora Neale Hurston in the year of 1975. Both Alice Walker and Zora Neale Hurston shared the same literary movement of postmodernism, showcasing the tough battles that African American women had to overcome during the harsh times of segregation in their culture.

The Color Purple, by Alice Walker, is a fictional tale, with its setting being based upon the horrible times of segregation. Celie is the main character in The Color Purple, a fourteen year old African American girl who lives in rural Georgia. The fact that Celie is African American and very uneducated provides sufficient evidence that postmodernism is shining its light down on Celia by showing the negative effect that women have in African American culture during the time of segregation. Winning the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in the year of 1983, for her astonishing novel, The Color Purple, has made Alice Walker the very first African American women to win this amazing prize. Along with that accomplishing prize, Walker also won the National Book Award for Fiction in the year of 1983. Mel Watkins of the New York Times Book Review wrote that it is a “striking and consummately well-written novel,” admiring the novels intensely emotional impact. Though the novel has gained much earned critical approval, it has also been the subject of controversy. The Color Purple is number 17 on the American Library Association’s list of most frequently challenged or banned books. Some of the most commonly cited reasons for banning the novel consists of sexual explicitness, outspoken language, harsh violence, and homosexuality. It was not until during the release of the novels film in the year of 1985 at which The Color Purple exceeded its top most controversy. The exceeding controversy focused around the image of African American men, which some critics saw as encouraging stereotypical fiction of African American male violence, while others found the portrayal irresistible and engaging.

Another fictional novel created by the brilliant Alice Walker is called Meridian. This novel is set during the 1960s through the 1970s. Meridian, by many, has been portrayed as Walker’s own true inspiration on the modern civil rights movement, due to the compassion and all the hard work she does for the civil rights movement. Meridian is based around an African American women named Meridian Hill. As Meridian Hill attends Saxon college, she embody’s herself with the civil rights movement during at which the desperate time of the movement becomes brutally violent. The tale then carries on to the point in her life where her relationship is crumbling to pieces, but her long lasting efforts to support the movement still stands at its tallest. At the time Walker was writing this novel, many African American people were drifting away from encouraging nonviolence and civil disobedience, in which had defined the beginning years of the movement, in this by gaining many supporters. Some literary critics conclude that this fictionist novel is a judgment of the Civil Rights Movement from that period. These critics also suppose that Walker’s work is implying that the revolution never fully covered the suffering of women, in exchange it exemplified horrific values. Some critics thought that Walker used Meridian to showcase her womanist approach and did not really convey the true matter of the civil rights movement. Walker, a very active believer of the power of women everywhere, she describes her view of herself as a tough person, though to not forget she is still one not without problems. Walker contends that personal struggles are an inescapable part of life. Walker strongly argues that this is how individuals overcome obstacles and, all around, define their characters. Meridian, along with The Color Purple and many of her other inspiring and breathtaking works features examples of strong female role models from a time where it was not so easy as it is now to gain the same social and educational perspectives as it was during the despicable times of segregation. Alice Walker suggests that a womanist is an African American feminist, she also claims that an African American feminist as womanist argues to feminism, influencing bold interests and contrasting ways to look at feminism.